Well, as a student of education, long time childcare provider, and future teacher-- this stuff catches my attention quite a bit and I felt it deserved its own "room," so to speak. <3

 

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.

Margaret Mead (via myquotelibrary)

thedailywhat:

The Kids Are All In Jail of the Day: According to a study published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pediatrics, just under a third of all American citizens will be arrested before the age of 23.
When a similar study, published nearly half a century ago by criminologist Ron Christensen, claimed that 22% of Americans under 23 would be arrested, the result shocked the country.
The latest study, compiled by University of North Carolina-Charlotte criminologist Robert Brame and his team using over a decade’s worth of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, suggests that number may have increased by as much as 8.2% over the past 44 years.
“There’s a lot more arresting going on now,” said Carnegie Mellon criminologist Alfred Blumstein, who was a member of President Lyndon Johnson’s crime task force alongside Christensen. Blumstein pointed out that drugs and domestic violence — crimes that would not have been a priority for police in the 60s — account for some of the increase in arrests.
Criminologist Megan Kurlychek also noted that most smaller offenses were handled informally by local authorities 40 years ago. “Society is a lot less tolerant of these teenage behaviors,” she said, emphasizing that “arrests have worse consequences than ever for these juveniles.”
“[Arrest records] follow you forever,” Kurlychek said. “The average teenager who steals an iPod or is arrested for possession of marijuana — why do we make that define their lives?” 
[usatoday.]

thedailywhat:

The Kids Are All In Jail of the Day: According to a study published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pediatrics, just under a third of all American citizens will be arrested before the age of 23.

When a similar study, published nearly half a century ago by criminologist Ron Christensen, claimed that 22% of Americans under 23 would be arrested, the result shocked the country.

The latest study, compiled by University of North Carolina-Charlotte criminologist Robert Brame and his team using over a decade’s worth of data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, suggests that number may have increased by as much as 8.2% over the past 44 years.

“There’s a lot more arresting going on now,” said Carnegie Mellon criminologist Alfred Blumstein, who was a member of President Lyndon Johnson’s crime task force alongside Christensen. Blumstein pointed out that drugs and domestic violence — crimes that would not have been a priority for police in the 60s — account for some of the increase in arrests.

Criminologist Megan Kurlychek also noted that most smaller offenses were handled informally by local authorities 40 years ago. “Society is a lot less tolerant of these teenage behaviors,” she said, emphasizing that “arrests have worse consequences than ever for these juveniles.”

“[Arrest records] follow you forever,” Kurlychek said. “The average teenager who steals an iPod or is arrested for possession of marijuana — why do we make that define their lives?” 

[usatoday.]

nypl:

Last weekend’s New York Times featured a powerful profile on NYPL patron Leironica Hawkins, who has Asperger’s Syndrome. Currently on display at The New York Public Library’s Grand Central location (located at 135 East 46th Street) is a fascinating art exhibition, Asperger’s Syndrome: An Invisible Disability, created by Leironica. Above is some of the art, all drawn by Leironica, featured in the exhibition.   

it's the music, people!: Reforming education dos & don'ts

itsthemusicpeople:

by Scott McLeod based on a recent article from Alberta Views and the new book Surpassing Shanghai

What the U.S.A. does that doesn’t/isn’t/hasn’t work/working/worked:

  • ‘market-based’ reforms (the application of ‘business insights’ to the running of schools)
  • emphasize…

kidsneedscience:

Both the first day of winter and the shortest day of the year began early this morning, the morning of the winter solstice.  The word solstice is relatively old in English, dating back to the 13th century.  Solstice derives from the Latin word solstitium meaning very literally the point at which the sun stands still, a combination of the words sol meaning sun and the past participial stem of sistere meaning to come to a stop, make stand still.  Celebrated thoughout history as either a secular or religious day, the solstice marks the point on the ecliptic when the Northern Hemisphere is pointed most away from the sun and therefore has the shortest day. 

Image of solstices and equinoxes courtesy NASA.  Meme of ‘axial tilt’ authorship unknown.

Today’s post is for my B.  Happy First Day of Winter, B!

MIT Announces Platform for Free Online Courses

aarayafalcone:

Unlocking knowledge empowering minds. Free lecture notes, exams, and videos from MIT. No registration required.

an e-book about the value of paper books. It’s almost a film, almost a game, certainly a book. Really, it’s a story that’s reaching out to become a new type of creation. As the Times UK put it, “It is not inconceivable that, at some point in the future, a short children’s story called ‘The Fantastic Flying Books of Mr. Morris Lessmore’ will be regarded as one of the most influential titles of the early 21st century.”

Having downloaded and “read” (i.e. “experienced”) this book, I wholeheartedly agree.

The Perfect Story for the Kid Whose Parents Have an iPad (via interestingsnippets)

I’ve seen this and totally agree! This thing is fantastic!

The Great Education Hypocrisy: What's So Bad About For-Profit Teaching?

world-shaker:

iamlittlei:

Given the urgency of improving the US education system, we can no longer afford to shut out an entire group of providers. In a time of declining state and federal revenues, policymakers should be stimulating, not stifling, the influx of private capital to our education system. When it comes to other crucial national challenges, policymakers do not ask whether they should engage for-profit companies, but how they should. It is time for education policymakers to follow suit.

EDUCATION, I’D LIKE TO INTRODUCE YOU TO ENTREPRENEURS

I have some issues with this. 

(I’m exhausted and I’ve just downed half a beer in about 5 minutes, so bear with me.)

Here’s the thing with teaching: you are not selling a product. You don’t take flights in a government-operated airplane, but the government is not obligated to provide every citizen with access to air travel.

The government is obligated to provide every citizen with quality education, regardless of ability to pay.

In “for-profit” education, who exactly is the paying customer? The students? Their families? What about when they can’t pay? What then?

Who exactly is profiting? The teachers? What, from the money the students pay? 

Do you see what I mean?

Look, “for-profit” education + gov’t money is exactly what is happening in higher ed all over this country, and think about how excellently that is working to make college ed accessible for everyone in America, regardless of socioeconomic status.

Oh, wait.

Isn’t this more or less what NCLB was doing? Trying the for-profit model, except “profit” was “funding” and to keep it you had to score highly on tests or else you were failing and would therefore lose the money which would like, suddenly magically motivate everyone to start teaching or something? And the now-even-more impoverished schools would turn around because they’d have to to get the money they needed? Except they didn’t have the money they needed, so…

I just can’t deal with this whole “Let’s run education like a private business!” bullshit. It’s not hypocrisy. It’s a fundamentally different kind of service than the ones listed in this article.

Sorry it took me so long to weigh in—I couldn’t find my soapbox.

My reply is to the the original title of the article:

In a sentence, the problem with for profit educators is that the vast majority are providing a subpar, unaccredited “degree” while leeching away a significant chunk of federal and state financial aid dollars that could go to students at real universities who are more likely to persist, and who are guaranteed to earn a degree that’s actually worth something if they graduate.

This Atlantic article also ignores the fact that no self-respecting public institution is a diploma mill. This phenomenon is exclusive to the for-profit arena they’re championing here. Don’t believe me? Here’s a list of ANIMALS that have been granted degrees by for profit institutions.

In another sentence: The University of Phoenix requires its faculty to have at least a Masters or Ph.D. to be able to teach for the University of Phoenix. Those degrees just can’t come from the University of Phoenix because they’re unaccredited.

True story.

(Source: gjmueller)